No Cover Image

Journal article 27 views 5 downloads

Identifying Dysphagia and Demographic Associations in Older Adults Using Electronic Health Records: A National Longitudinal Observational Study in Wales (United Kingdom) 2008–2018

Joe Hollinghurst, David G. Smithard Orcid Logo

Dysphagia

Swansea University Author: Joe Hollinghurst

  • 60834.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

    Download (1.44MB)

Abstract

Dysphagia is increasingly being recognised as a geriatric syndrome (giant). There is limited research on the prevalence of dysphagia using electronic health records. To investigate associations between dysphagia, as recorded in electronic health records and age, frailty using the electronic frailty...

Full description

Published in: Dysphagia
ISSN: 0179-051X 1432-0460
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60834
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Dysphagia is increasingly being recognised as a geriatric syndrome (giant). There is limited research on the prevalence of dysphagia using electronic health records. To investigate associations between dysphagia, as recorded in electronic health records and age, frailty using the electronic frailty index, gender and deprivation (Welsh index of multiple deprivation). A Cross-sectional longitudinal cohort study in over 400,000 older adults was undertaken (65 +) in Wales (United Kingdom) per year from 2008 to 2018. We used the secure anonymised information linkage databank to identify dysphagia diagnoses in primary and secondary care. We used chi-squared tests and multivariate logistic regression to investigate associations between dysphagia diagnosis and age, frailty (using the electronic Frailty index), gender and deprivation. Data indicated < 1% of individuals were recorded as having a dysphagia diagnosis per year. We found dysphagia to be statistically significantly associated with older age, more severe frailty and individuals from more deprived areas. Multivariate analyses indicated increased odds ratios [OR (95% confidence intervals)] for a dysphagia diagnosis with increased age [reference 65–74: aged 75–84 OR 1.09 (1.07, 1.12), 85 + OR 1.23 (1.20, 1.27)], frailty (reference fit: mild frailty 2.45 (2.38, 2.53), moderate frailty 4.64 (4.49, 4.79) and severe frailty 7.87 (7.55, 8.21)] and individuals from most deprived areas [reference 5. Least deprived, 1. Most deprived: 1.10 (1.06, 1.14)]. The study has identified that prevalence of diagnosed dysphagia is lower than previously reported. This study has confirmed the association of dysphagia with increasing age and frailty. A previously unreported association with deprivation has been identified. Deprivation is a multifactorial problem that is known to affect health outcomes, and the association with dysphagia should not be a surprise. Research in to this relationship is indicated.
Keywords: Frailty; Old age; Dysphagia; Prevalence; Epidemiology; Deprivation
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: This work was supported by the Medical Research Council [MR/V028367/1]; Health and Care Research Wales [Project: SCF-18-1504]; Health Data Research UK [HDR-9006] which receives its funding from the UK Medical Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, Department of Health and Social Care (England), Chief Scientist Ofce of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates, Health and Social Care Research and Development Division (Welsh Government), Public Health Agency (Northern Ireland), British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the Wellcome Trust; and Administrative Data Research UK which is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council [Grant ES/S007393/1]. Funding for this particular aspect of the work was via the Sidney De Hann Trust.