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How to Research Online Newspaper Articles to Conduct a Qualitative Media Content Analysis

Maria Pournara Orcid Logo

SAGE Research Methods: Doing Research Online

Swansea University Author: Maria Pournara Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.4135/9781529611311

Abstract

This How-to Guide describes what qualitative media analysis is, when and how it can be used to research online newspaper articles and shows how to draft a protocol to address the research problem under investigation. The guide also discusses similarities and differences between the more traditional...

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Published in: SAGE Research Methods: Doing Research Online
ISBN: 9781529611311
Published: 1 Oliver’s Yard, 55 City Road, London EC1Y 1SP United Kingdom  SAGE Publications, Ltd. 2022
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61894
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Abstract: This How-to Guide describes what qualitative media analysis is, when and how it can be used to research online newspaper articles and shows how to draft a protocol to address the research problem under investigation. The guide also discusses similarities and differences between the more traditional quantitative content analysis often used in media research and the more recent qualitative content analysis which is far less rigid and puts emphasis on the researcher’s reflexivity and ability to interact with the materials to arrive at more meaningful conclusions with regard to the communication of messages. Furthermore, an overview of the 12 stages of the qualitative content analysis process is presented and a specific focus is placed on studying online newspaper articles. The 12 stages of the process include steps such as identifying a theoretical problem, finding documents, developing a protocol, collecting, coding, organising data, data analysis, and creating a final report. A more specific focus is then placed on how to develop a protocol which can meaningfully address the research question(s) and help categorise the data. The guide finishes with an example of a protocol used in a research project on organised crime representations in British national newspapers and a brief discussion on some of the research decisions and choices that guided its drafting, examination, and revision.
College: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences