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The polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate lowers circulating catecholamine concentrations and alters lipid metabolism during graded exercise in man: a randomized cross-over study

Rachel Churm Orcid Logo, Liam M. Williams, Gareth Dunseath, Sarah L. Prior, Richard M. Bracken, Gareth Dunseath Orcid Logo, Sarah Prior Orcid Logo, Richard Bracken Orcid Logo

European Journal of Nutrition, Volume: 62, Issue: 3, Pages: 1517 - 1526

Swansea University Authors: Rachel Churm Orcid Logo, Gareth Dunseath Orcid Logo, Sarah Prior Orcid Logo, Richard Bracken Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Purpose: Physical exercise is shown to mitigate catecholamine metabolites; however, it is unknown if exercise-induced increases in sympatho-adrenal activity or catecholamine metabolites are influenced by ingestion of specific catechins found within green tea. This study explored the impact of epigal...

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Published in: European Journal of Nutrition
ISSN: 1436-6207 1436-6215
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa62385
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Abstract: Purpose: Physical exercise is shown to mitigate catecholamine metabolites; however, it is unknown if exercise-induced increases in sympatho-adrenal activity or catecholamine metabolites are influenced by ingestion of specific catechins found within green tea. This study explored the impact of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) ingestion on catecholamine metabolism during graded cycle exercise in humans. Methods: Eight males (22.4 ± 3.3 years, BMI:25.7 ± 2.4 kg.m2) performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind, cross-over trial after consumption (1450 mg) of either EGCG or placebo (PLAC) and performed graded cycling to volitional exhaustion. Venous bloods were taken at rest, 2 h post-ingestion and after every 3-min stage. Blood variables were analysed for catecholamines, catecholamine metanephrines and metabolic variables at rest, 2 h post-ingestion (POST-ING), peak rate of lipid oxidation (FATpeak), lactate threshold (LT) and peak rate of oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Data were analysed using SPSS (Version 26). Results: Resting catecholamine and metanephrines were similar between trials. Plasma adrenaline (AD) was lower in ECGC treatment group between trials at FATpeak (P < 0.05), LT (P < 0.001) and VO2peak (P < 0.01). Noradrenaline (NA) was lower under EGCG at POST (P < 0.05), FATpeak (P < 0.05), LT (P < 0.01) and VO2peak (P < 0.05) compared to PLAC. Metanephrines, glucose and lactate increased similarly with exercise intensity in both trials. Lipid oxidation rate was 32% lower in EGCG at FATpeak (EGCG 0.33 ± 0.14 vs. PLAC 0.49 ± 0.11 g.min−1, P < 0.05). Cycle time to exhaustion was similar (NS). Conclusion: Acute EGCG supplementation reduced circulating catecholamines but not; metanephrine, glucose or lactates, response to graded exercise. Lower circulating catecholamines may explain a lower lipid oxidation rate.
Keywords: Epigallocatechin gallate, Catecholamines, Substrate metabolism, Graded exercise
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.
Issue: 3
Start Page: 1517
End Page: 1526