No Cover Image

Journal article 133 views 30 downloads

Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery

Larissa Nicholas, Elinor Winrow, Aisling Devine Orcid Logo, Iain Robertson Orcid Logo, Ian Mabbett Orcid Logo

Environment, Development and Sustainability

Swansea University Authors: Larissa Nicholas, Elinor Winrow, Aisling Devine Orcid Logo, Iain Robertson Orcid Logo, Ian Mabbett Orcid Logo

  • IRobertson VOR.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

    Download (1.18MB)

Abstract

The disposal of faecal sludge from non-networked sanitation amenities leads to contamination of the surrounding environment and increasing public health problems across developing countries. Permanent solutions to deal with faecal sludge are required to solve the sanitation crisis and achieve the Su...

Full description

Published in: Environment, Development and Sustainability
ISSN: 1387-585X 1573-2975
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65223
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2023-12-06T10:41:02Z
last_indexed 2023-12-06T10:41:02Z
id cronfa65223
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><rfc1807 xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>65223</id><entry>2023-12-06</entry><title>Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>1f94486c34f5b8272a65b750a3c7f9f2</sid><firstname>Larissa</firstname><surname>Nicholas</surname><name>Larissa Nicholas</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>14f4ae796c254f426640d6136fd39ad9</sid><firstname>Elinor</firstname><surname>Winrow</surname><name>Elinor Winrow</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>1e3d02ac9be89fa0b4067440c28092ff</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-4212-3984</ORCID><firstname>Aisling</firstname><surname>Devine</surname><name>Aisling Devine</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>ef8912c57e0140e9ecb2a69b7e34467e</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-7174-4523</ORCID><firstname>Iain</firstname><surname>Robertson</surname><name>Iain Robertson</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>5363e29b6a34d3e72b5d31140c9b51f0</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-2959-1716</ORCID><firstname>Ian</firstname><surname>Mabbett</surname><name>Ian Mabbett</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2023-12-06</date><deptcode>RECS</deptcode><abstract>The disposal of faecal sludge from non-networked sanitation amenities leads to contamination of the surrounding environment and increasing public health problems across developing countries. Permanent solutions to deal with faecal sludge are required to solve the sanitation crisis and achieve the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6 “ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all” by 2030. Full-scale pyrolysis of faecal sludge in developing countries is fast becoming a safe and long-term option. Pyrolysis not only eliminates pathogens within the sludge but produces biochar as an end product which has the potential as a soil amendment to increase crop yield. In general, faecal sludge biochars have high pH values, high ash contents, and high macro-and micronutrient concentrations. Compared to biochar from lignocellulosic materials, faecal sludge biochar contains less carbon and exhibits lower porosities, and lower surface areas. However, evaluating the properties of faecal sludge biochar is difficult due to the different technologies used in collection, storage, and transportation of the feedstock. Differences in faecal sludge characteristics based on location, climate, age of the sludge, type of sanitation technology and seasonality are also factors in determining the properties of faecal sludge biochars. These factors contribute to the difficulty in describing faecal sludge biochar properties in general terms, and there is an argument to be made that characteristics of large-scale faecal sludge biochar should be determined on a case-by-case basis. The conclusion of this review is that future research should concentrate on short-term and long-term field studies of faecal sludge biochar application to different soil types.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Environment, Development and Sustainability</journal><volume>0</volume><journalNumber/><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher>Springer Science and Business Media LLC</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>1387-585X</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1573-2975</issnElectronic><keywords>Faecal sludge; Biochar; Agronomic; Soil; Resource recovery; Sanitation</keywords><publishedDay>30</publishedDay><publishedMonth>11</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2023</publishedYear><publishedDate>2023-11-30</publishedDate><doi>10.1007/s10668-023-04219-4</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Enterprise European Network</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>RECS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><funders>This work was supported, in whole or in part, by the Bill &amp; Melinda Gates Foundation [OPP1149054], and under the grant conditions of the Foundation, a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Generic License has already been assigned to the Author Accepted Manuscript version that might arise from this submission. The work was also supported by Swansea University’s ‘SUNRISE’ project funded through GCRF via EPSRC [EP/P032591/1].</funders><projectreference/><lastEdited>2024-04-09T16:23:48.6449282</lastEdited><Created>2023-12-06T10:33:22.4232726</Created><path><level id="1">Faculty of Science and Engineering</level><level id="2">School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Chemistry</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Larissa</firstname><surname>Nicholas</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Elinor</firstname><surname>Winrow</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Aisling</firstname><surname>Devine</surname><orcid>0000-0003-4212-3984</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Iain</firstname><surname>Robertson</surname><orcid>0000-0001-7174-4523</orcid><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Ian</firstname><surname>Mabbett</surname><orcid>0000-0003-2959-1716</orcid><order>5</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>65223__29218__881a0d07f90c4be99e951ef9057e0d40.pdf</filename><originalFilename>IRobertson VOR.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2023-12-06T10:38:58.0490486</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>1240242</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language><licence>https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/</licence></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling v2 65223 2023-12-06 Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery 1f94486c34f5b8272a65b750a3c7f9f2 Larissa Nicholas Larissa Nicholas true false 14f4ae796c254f426640d6136fd39ad9 Elinor Winrow Elinor Winrow true false 1e3d02ac9be89fa0b4067440c28092ff 0000-0003-4212-3984 Aisling Devine Aisling Devine true false ef8912c57e0140e9ecb2a69b7e34467e 0000-0001-7174-4523 Iain Robertson Iain Robertson true false 5363e29b6a34d3e72b5d31140c9b51f0 0000-0003-2959-1716 Ian Mabbett Ian Mabbett true false 2023-12-06 RECS The disposal of faecal sludge from non-networked sanitation amenities leads to contamination of the surrounding environment and increasing public health problems across developing countries. Permanent solutions to deal with faecal sludge are required to solve the sanitation crisis and achieve the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6 “ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all” by 2030. Full-scale pyrolysis of faecal sludge in developing countries is fast becoming a safe and long-term option. Pyrolysis not only eliminates pathogens within the sludge but produces biochar as an end product which has the potential as a soil amendment to increase crop yield. In general, faecal sludge biochars have high pH values, high ash contents, and high macro-and micronutrient concentrations. Compared to biochar from lignocellulosic materials, faecal sludge biochar contains less carbon and exhibits lower porosities, and lower surface areas. However, evaluating the properties of faecal sludge biochar is difficult due to the different technologies used in collection, storage, and transportation of the feedstock. Differences in faecal sludge characteristics based on location, climate, age of the sludge, type of sanitation technology and seasonality are also factors in determining the properties of faecal sludge biochars. These factors contribute to the difficulty in describing faecal sludge biochar properties in general terms, and there is an argument to be made that characteristics of large-scale faecal sludge biochar should be determined on a case-by-case basis. The conclusion of this review is that future research should concentrate on short-term and long-term field studies of faecal sludge biochar application to different soil types. Journal Article Environment, Development and Sustainability 0 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 1387-585X 1573-2975 Faecal sludge; Biochar; Agronomic; Soil; Resource recovery; Sanitation 30 11 2023 2023-11-30 10.1007/s10668-023-04219-4 COLLEGE NANME Enterprise European Network COLLEGE CODE RECS Swansea University This work was supported, in whole or in part, by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation [OPP1149054], and under the grant conditions of the Foundation, a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Generic License has already been assigned to the Author Accepted Manuscript version that might arise from this submission. The work was also supported by Swansea University’s ‘SUNRISE’ project funded through GCRF via EPSRC [EP/P032591/1]. 2024-04-09T16:23:48.6449282 2023-12-06T10:33:22.4232726 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Chemistry Larissa Nicholas 1 Elinor Winrow 2 Aisling Devine 0000-0003-4212-3984 3 Iain Robertson 0000-0001-7174-4523 4 Ian Mabbett 0000-0003-2959-1716 5 65223__29218__881a0d07f90c4be99e951ef9057e0d40.pdf IRobertson VOR.pdf 2023-12-06T10:38:58.0490486 Output 1240242 application/pdf Version of Record true This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery
spellingShingle Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery
Larissa Nicholas
Elinor Winrow
Aisling Devine
Iain Robertson
Ian Mabbett
title_short Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery
title_full Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery
title_fullStr Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery
title_full_unstemmed Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery
title_sort Faecal sludge pyrolysis as a circular economic approach to waste management and nutrient recovery
author_id_str_mv 1f94486c34f5b8272a65b750a3c7f9f2
14f4ae796c254f426640d6136fd39ad9
1e3d02ac9be89fa0b4067440c28092ff
ef8912c57e0140e9ecb2a69b7e34467e
5363e29b6a34d3e72b5d31140c9b51f0
author_id_fullname_str_mv 1f94486c34f5b8272a65b750a3c7f9f2_***_Larissa Nicholas
14f4ae796c254f426640d6136fd39ad9_***_Elinor Winrow
1e3d02ac9be89fa0b4067440c28092ff_***_Aisling Devine
ef8912c57e0140e9ecb2a69b7e34467e_***_Iain Robertson
5363e29b6a34d3e72b5d31140c9b51f0_***_Ian Mabbett
author Larissa Nicholas
Elinor Winrow
Aisling Devine
Iain Robertson
Ian Mabbett
author2 Larissa Nicholas
Elinor Winrow
Aisling Devine
Iain Robertson
Ian Mabbett
format Journal article
container_title Environment, Development and Sustainability
container_volume 0
publishDate 2023
institution Swansea University
issn 1387-585X
1573-2975
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s10668-023-04219-4
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Chemistry{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Chemistry
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The disposal of faecal sludge from non-networked sanitation amenities leads to contamination of the surrounding environment and increasing public health problems across developing countries. Permanent solutions to deal with faecal sludge are required to solve the sanitation crisis and achieve the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6 “ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all” by 2030. Full-scale pyrolysis of faecal sludge in developing countries is fast becoming a safe and long-term option. Pyrolysis not only eliminates pathogens within the sludge but produces biochar as an end product which has the potential as a soil amendment to increase crop yield. In general, faecal sludge biochars have high pH values, high ash contents, and high macro-and micronutrient concentrations. Compared to biochar from lignocellulosic materials, faecal sludge biochar contains less carbon and exhibits lower porosities, and lower surface areas. However, evaluating the properties of faecal sludge biochar is difficult due to the different technologies used in collection, storage, and transportation of the feedstock. Differences in faecal sludge characteristics based on location, climate, age of the sludge, type of sanitation technology and seasonality are also factors in determining the properties of faecal sludge biochars. These factors contribute to the difficulty in describing faecal sludge biochar properties in general terms, and there is an argument to be made that characteristics of large-scale faecal sludge biochar should be determined on a case-by-case basis. The conclusion of this review is that future research should concentrate on short-term and long-term field studies of faecal sludge biochar application to different soil types.
published_date 2023-11-30T16:23:44Z
_version_ 1795871184971104256
score 11.00654