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Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention

Elli Jalo Orcid Logo, Mikael Fogelholm Orcid Logo, Margriet Westerterp-Plantenga Orcid Logo, Tanja C. Adam, Mathijs Drummen Orcid Logo, Maija Huttunen-Lenz Orcid Logo, Louise Kjølbæk Orcid Logo, José Alfredo Martinez, Teodora Handjieva-Darlenska Orcid Logo, Moira A. Taylor Orcid Logo, Jennie Brand-Miller Orcid Logo, Sally Poppitt Orcid Logo, Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo, Tony Lam Orcid Logo, Santiago Navas-Carretero Orcid Logo, Georgi Bogdanov Orcid Logo, Liz Simpson Orcid Logo, Roslyn Muirhead Orcid Logo, Marta P. Silvestre Orcid Logo, Nils Joseph Swindell Orcid Logo, Anne Raben Orcid Logo, Hanna Konttinen Orcid Logo

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Swansea University Authors: Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo, Nils Joseph Swindell Orcid Logo

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Abstract

ObjectiveTo examine whether eating behavior and perceived stress predict the maintenance of self-reported dietary change and adherence to dietary instructions during an intervention.DesignA secondary analysis of the behavior maintenance stage (6–36 months) of the 3-year PREVIEW intervention (PREVent...

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Published in: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
ISSN: 1499-4046
Published: Elsevier BV 2024
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In addition, higher disinhibition predicted higher saturated fat intake and lower fiber intake, and higher hunger predicted lower fiber intake. Stress was not associated with energy intake or dietary quality. Eating behaviors and stress were not consistently associated with adherence to dietary instructions.Conclusions and ImplicationsHigher cognitive restraint predicted lower energy intake (food quantity), but disinhibition and hunger were also associated with dietary quality.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior</journal><volume>0</volume><journalNumber/><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher>Elsevier BV</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>1499-4046</issnPrint><issnElectronic/><keywords>Eating Inventory; eating style; behavior change; behavior maintenance; food consumption</keywords><publishedDay>28</publishedDay><publishedMonth>2</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2024</publishedYear><publishedDate>2024-02-28</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.jneb.2024.01.001</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><funders>he PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World project was funded by the following institutions: European Union Framework Programme 7 (grant no. 312057), The Glycemic Index Foundation Australia through royalties to The University of Sydney; The New Zealand Health Research Council (14/191) and the University of Auckland Faculty Research Development Fund; The Danish Agriculture and Food Council; The Danish Meat and Research Institute; National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre; Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council; Juho Vainio Foundation; Academy of Finland (grant nos.: 272376, 314383, and 266286); Finnish Medical Foundation; Gyllenberg Foundation; Novo Nordisk Foundation; Finnish Diabetes Research Foundation; University of Helsinki; Government Research Funds for Helsinki University Hospital. The Cambridge Weight Plan donated all products for the 8-week low-energy–diet period. Nutritics donated dietary analysis software used by the University of Nottingham. Elli Jalo received personal grants for the preparation of this manuscript from the Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation, Emil Aaltonen Foundation, and Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation. 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spelling v2 65505 2024-01-24 Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false 189d1ae79723a932dc37ae54fff6e4cd 0000-0003-3742-6139 Nils Joseph Swindell Nils Joseph Swindell true true 2024-01-24 STSC ObjectiveTo examine whether eating behavior and perceived stress predict the maintenance of self-reported dietary change and adherence to dietary instructions during an intervention.DesignA secondary analysis of the behavior maintenance stage (6–36 months) of the 3-year PREVIEW intervention (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World).ParticipantsAdults (n = 1,311) with overweight and prediabetes at preintervention baseline.Variables MeasuredEating behavior (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), and dietary intake (4-day food records on 4 occasions) were reported.AnalysisAssociations between predictors and dietary outcomes were examined with linear mixed-effects models for repeated measurements.ResultsEating behaviors and stress at 6 months did not predict the subsequent change in dietary outcomes, but higher cognitive restraint predicted lower energy intake, and both higher disinhibition and hunger predicted higher energy intake during the following behavior maintenance stage. In addition, higher disinhibition predicted higher saturated fat intake and lower fiber intake, and higher hunger predicted lower fiber intake. Stress was not associated with energy intake or dietary quality. Eating behaviors and stress were not consistently associated with adherence to dietary instructions.Conclusions and ImplicationsHigher cognitive restraint predicted lower energy intake (food quantity), but disinhibition and hunger were also associated with dietary quality. Journal Article Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 0 Elsevier BV 1499-4046 Eating Inventory; eating style; behavior change; behavior maintenance; food consumption 28 2 2024 2024-02-28 10.1016/j.jneb.2024.01.001 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University he PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World project was funded by the following institutions: European Union Framework Programme 7 (grant no. 312057), The Glycemic Index Foundation Australia through royalties to The University of Sydney; The New Zealand Health Research Council (14/191) and the University of Auckland Faculty Research Development Fund; The Danish Agriculture and Food Council; The Danish Meat and Research Institute; National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre; Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council; Juho Vainio Foundation; Academy of Finland (grant nos.: 272376, 314383, and 266286); Finnish Medical Foundation; Gyllenberg Foundation; Novo Nordisk Foundation; Finnish Diabetes Research Foundation; University of Helsinki; Government Research Funds for Helsinki University Hospital. The Cambridge Weight Plan donated all products for the 8-week low-energy–diet period. Nutritics donated dietary analysis software used by the University of Nottingham. Elli Jalo received personal grants for the preparation of this manuscript from the Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation, Emil Aaltonen Foundation, and Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation. Hanna Konttinen also received funding from the Academy of Finland (grants no. 314135 and 309157 to HK) for the preparation of this manuscript. 2024-03-20T15:50:58.9350564 2024-01-24T13:53:43.5157254 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Sport and Exercise Sciences Elli Jalo 0000-0002-9987-1716 1 Mikael Fogelholm 0000-0001-8110-102x 2 Margriet Westerterp-Plantenga 0000-0002-6326-3102 3 Tanja C. Adam 4 Mathijs Drummen 0000-0003-3896-043x 5 Maija Huttunen-Lenz 0000-0002-1034-1613 6 Louise Kjølbæk 0000-0003-4310-9332 7 José Alfredo Martinez 8 Teodora Handjieva-Darlenska 0000-0001-8307-343x 9 Moira A. Taylor 0000-0003-4100-8343 10 Jennie Brand-Miller 0000-0002-6797-8754 11 Sally Poppitt 0000-0002-2214-8378 12 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 13 Tony Lam 0000-0002-3940-7129 14 Santiago Navas-Carretero 0000-0002-5163-2230 15 Georgi Bogdanov 0000-0001-9892-4209 16 Liz Simpson 0000-0001-9353-6258 17 Roslyn Muirhead 0000-0002-4374-0362 18 Marta P. Silvestre 0000-0001-9327-2897 19 Nils Joseph Swindell 0000-0003-3742-6139 20 Anne Raben 0000-0001-5229-4491 21 Hanna Konttinen 0000-0002-6001-4418 22 65505__29766__96560e3353de4218afac04982eca9d41.pdf 65505.pdf 2024-03-20T15:47:41.7708284 Output 305362 application/pdf Proof true Copyright: 2024 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY license true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention
spellingShingle Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention
Gareth Stratton
Nils Joseph Swindell
title_short Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention
title_full Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention
title_fullStr Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention
title_full_unstemmed Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention
title_sort Role of Eating Behavior and Stress in Maintenance of Dietary Changes During the PREVIEW Intervention
author_id_str_mv 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01
189d1ae79723a932dc37ae54fff6e4cd
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth Stratton
189d1ae79723a932dc37ae54fff6e4cd_***_Nils Joseph Swindell
author Gareth Stratton
Nils Joseph Swindell
author2 Elli Jalo
Mikael Fogelholm
Margriet Westerterp-Plantenga
Tanja C. Adam
Mathijs Drummen
Maija Huttunen-Lenz
Louise Kjølbæk
José Alfredo Martinez
Teodora Handjieva-Darlenska
Moira A. Taylor
Jennie Brand-Miller
Sally Poppitt
Gareth Stratton
Tony Lam
Santiago Navas-Carretero
Georgi Bogdanov
Liz Simpson
Roslyn Muirhead
Marta P. Silvestre
Nils Joseph Swindell
Anne Raben
Hanna Konttinen
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
container_volume 0
publishDate 2024
institution Swansea University
issn 1499-4046
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.jneb.2024.01.001
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Sport and Exercise Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Sport and Exercise Sciences
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description ObjectiveTo examine whether eating behavior and perceived stress predict the maintenance of self-reported dietary change and adherence to dietary instructions during an intervention.DesignA secondary analysis of the behavior maintenance stage (6–36 months) of the 3-year PREVIEW intervention (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World).ParticipantsAdults (n = 1,311) with overweight and prediabetes at preintervention baseline.Variables MeasuredEating behavior (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), and dietary intake (4-day food records on 4 occasions) were reported.AnalysisAssociations between predictors and dietary outcomes were examined with linear mixed-effects models for repeated measurements.ResultsEating behaviors and stress at 6 months did not predict the subsequent change in dietary outcomes, but higher cognitive restraint predicted lower energy intake, and both higher disinhibition and hunger predicted higher energy intake during the following behavior maintenance stage. In addition, higher disinhibition predicted higher saturated fat intake and lower fiber intake, and higher hunger predicted lower fiber intake. Stress was not associated with energy intake or dietary quality. Eating behaviors and stress were not consistently associated with adherence to dietary instructions.Conclusions and ImplicationsHigher cognitive restraint predicted lower energy intake (food quantity), but disinhibition and hunger were also associated with dietary quality.
published_date 2024-02-28T15:50:54Z
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