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Wealth and Sedentary Time Are Associated With Dietary Patterns Among Preadolescents in Nairobi City, Kenya

Noora Kanerva Orcid Logo, Lucy Joy Wachira Orcid Logo, Noora Uusi-Ranta, Esther L. Anono, Hanna M. Walsh Orcid Logo, Maijaliisa Erkkola, Sophie Ochola, Nils Joseph Swindell Orcid Logo, Jatta Salmela Orcid Logo, Henna Vepsäläinen, Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo, Vincent Onywera Orcid Logo, Mikael Fogelholm Orcid Logo

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Swansea University Authors: Nils Joseph Swindell Orcid Logo, Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo

Abstract

Objective: The study aimed to compare dietary patterns in preadolescents in urban areas with different physical activity and socioeconomic profiles in Nairobi, Kenya.Design: Cross-sectional.Participants: Preadolescents aged 9−14 years (n = 149) living in low- or middle-income areas in Nairobi.Variab...

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Published in: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
ISSN: 1499-4046
Published: Elsevier BV 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa62922
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Abstract: Objective: The study aimed to compare dietary patterns in preadolescents in urban areas with different physical activity and socioeconomic profiles in Nairobi, Kenya.Design: Cross-sectional.Participants: Preadolescents aged 9−14 years (n = 149) living in low- or middle-income areas in Nairobi.Variables Measured: Sociodemographic characteristics were collected using a validated questionnaire. Weight and height were measured. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire and physical activity by accelerometer.Analysis: Dietary patterns (DP) were formed through principal component analysis. Associations of age, sex, parental education, wealth, body mass index, physical activity, and sedentary time with DPs were analyzed with linear regression.Results: Three DPs explained 36% of the total variance in food consumption: (1) snacks, fast food, andmeat; (2) dairy products and plant protein; and (3) vegetables and refined grains. Higher wealth was associated with higher scores of the first DP (P < 0.05).Conclusions and Implications: Consumption of foods often deemed unhealthy (eg, snacks and fast food) was more frequent among preadolescents whose families were wealthier. Interventions that seek ways to promote healthy lifestyles among families residing in urban areas of Kenya are warranted.
Keywords: Dietary patterns, body mass index, physical activity, sedentary time, preadolescents
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering