No Cover Image

Journal article 45 views 11 downloads

Development and laboratory validation of a plant-derived repellent blend, effective against Aedes aegypti [Diptera: Culicidae], Anopheles gambiae [Diptera: Culicidae] and Culex quinquefasciatus [Diptera: Culicidae]

Martyn Wood, James Bull Orcid Logo, Kanagasooriyam Kanagachandran, Tariq Butt Orcid Logo

PLOS ONE, Volume: 19, Issue: 3, Start page: e0299144

Swansea University Authors: Martyn Wood, James Bull Orcid Logo, Tariq Butt Orcid Logo

  • 66086.VoR.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © 2024 Wood et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.

    Download (1.42MB)

Abstract

Mosquitoes of the genera Aedes, Anopheles and Culex vector a wide range of pathogens seriously affecting humans and livestock on a global scale. Over-reliance on insecticides and repellents has driven research into alternative, naturally-derived compounds to fulfil the same objectives. Steam distill...

Full description

Published in: PLOS ONE
ISSN: 1932-6203
Published: Public Library of Science (PLoS) 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa66086
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Mosquitoes of the genera Aedes, Anopheles and Culex vector a wide range of pathogens seriously affecting humans and livestock on a global scale. Over-reliance on insecticides and repellents has driven research into alternative, naturally-derived compounds to fulfil the same objectives. Steam distilled extracts of four plants with strong, yet attractive, volatile profiles were initially assessed for repellency in a dual-port olfactometer using Aedes aegypti as the model species. Picea sitchensis was found to be the most repellent, proving comparable to leading products when applied at 100% (p = 1.000). Key components of conifer-derived volatile profiles were then screened via electroantennography before those components eliciting an electrophysiological response were assayed individually in the olfactometer; according to WHO protocol. The most promising 5 were selected for reductive analyses to produce an optimised semiochemical blend. This combination, and a further two variations of the blend, were then progressed to a multi-species analysis using the BG-test whereby bite-attempt frequency on hands was assessed under different repellent treatments; assays were compared between Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. Efficacy was found against all three species, although it was found that Ae. aegypti was the most susceptible to the repellent, with An. gambiae being the least. Here, a novel, naturally-derived blend is presented with weak spatial repellency, as confirmed in laboratory assays. Further work will be required to assess the full extent of the potential of the products, both in terms of field application and species screening; however, the success of the products developed demonstrate that plant metabolites have great capacity for use in the repellent sector; both to improve upon known compounds and to reduce the usage of toxic products currently on the market.
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: “All research excepting the BG-cage trials was supported as PhD research by the Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships 2 (KESS 2) initiative; part funded by the Welsh Government’s European Social Fund (ESF) convergence program for West Wales and the Valleys with industry support from AgriSense BCS Ltd.
Issue: 3
Start Page: e0299144