No Cover Image

Journal article 579 views

Pregnancy IFN-gamma responses to foetal alloantigens are altered by maternal allergy and gravidity status. / LA Breckler; J Hale; A Taylor; JA Dunstan; CA Thornton; SL Prescott; Catherine Thornton

Allergy, Volume: 63, Issue: 11, Pages: 1473 - 1480

Swansea University Author: Catherine, Thornton

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: During pregnancy, variations in maternal-foetal cellular interactions may influence immune programming. This study was carried out to determine if maternal responses to foetal alloantigens are altered by maternal allergic disease and/or previous pregnancies.METHODS: For this cohort study...

Full description

Published in: Allergy
ISSN: 1398-9995
Published: Wiley 2008
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa9994
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: BACKGROUND: During pregnancy, variations in maternal-foetal cellular interactions may influence immune programming. This study was carried out to determine if maternal responses to foetal alloantigens are altered by maternal allergic disease and/or previous pregnancies.METHODS: For this cohort study, peripheral blood was collected from allergic (n = 69) and nonallergic (n = 63) pregnant women at 20, 30, 36-week gestation and 6-week postpartum (pp). Cord blood was collected at delivery. Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to measure maternal cytokine responses [interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, IL-13 and (interferon-gamma) IFN-gamma] at each time point towards foetal mononuclear cells.RESULTS: Maternal cytokine responses during pregnancy (20, 30 and 36 weeks) were suppressed compared to the responses at 6-week pp. The ratio of maternal IFN-gamma/IL-13 and IFN-gamma/IL-10 responses were lower during pregnancy. Allergic mothers had lower IFN-gamma responses at each time-point during pregnancy with the greatest difference in responses observed at 36-week gestation. When allergic and nonallergic women were further stratified by gravidity group, IFN-gamma responses of allergic multigravid mothers were significantly lower than nonallergic multigravid mothers during pregnancy.CONCLUSIONS: During normal pregnancy, peripheral T-cell cytokine responses to foetal alloantigens may be altered by both allergic status of the mother and previous pregnancies. These factors could influence the cytokine milieu experienced by the foetus and will be further explored in the development of allergic disease during early life
Keywords: allergy; alloimmune response; maternal–foetal interaction; pregnancy; T helper
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 11
Start Page: 1473
End Page: 1480