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Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy / D. E. Campbell; R. J. Boyle; C. A. Thornton; S. L. Prescott; Catherine Thornton

Clinical & Experimental Allergy, Volume: 45, Issue: 5, Pages: 844 - 858

Swansea University Author: Catherine, Thornton

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/cea.12531

Abstract

Allergic disease can be viewed as an early manifestation of immune dysregulation. Environmental exposures including maternal inflammation, diet, nutrient balance, microbial colonisation and toxin exposures can directly and indirectly influence immune programming in both pregnancy and the postnatal p...

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Published in: Clinical & Experimental Allergy
Published: 2015
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa23515
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Abstract: Allergic disease can be viewed as an early manifestation of immune dysregulation. Environmental exposures including maternal inflammation, diet, nutrient balance, microbial colonisation and toxin exposures can directly and indirectly influence immune programming in both pregnancy and the postnatal period. The intrauterine microclimate is critical for maternal and foetal immunological tolerance to sustain viable pregnancy, but appears susceptible to environmental conditions. Targeting aspects of the modern environment that promote aberrant patterns of immune response is logical for interventions aimed at primary prevention of allergic disease. Defining the mechanisms that underpin both natural and therapeutic acquisition of immunological tolerance in childhood will provide insights into the drivers of persistent immune dysregulation. In this review we summarise evidence that allergy is a consequence of intrauterine and early life immune dysregulation, with specific focus on contributing environmental risk factors occurring preconception, in utero and in the early postnatal period. We explore the immunological mechanisms which underpin tolerance and persistence of allergic disease during childhood. It is likely that future investigations within these two domains will ultimately provide a road map for the primary prevention of allergic disease.
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 5
Start Page: 844
End Page: 858