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Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy / D. E. Campbell; R. J. Boyle; C. A. Thornton; S. L. Prescott; Catherine Thornton

Clinical & Experimental Allergy, Volume: 45, Issue: 5, Pages: 844 - 858

Swansea University Author: Catherine, Thornton

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/cea.12531

Abstract

Allergic disease can be viewed as an early manifestation of immune dysregulation. Environmental exposures including maternal inflammation, diet, nutrient balance, microbial colonisation and toxin exposures can directly and indirectly influence immune programming in both pregnancy and the postnatal p...

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Published in: Clinical & Experimental Allergy
Published: 2015
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa23515
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first_indexed 2015-10-01T02:09:34Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T05:02:23Z
id cronfa23515
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spelling 2015-09-30T12:48:50.7473335 v2 23515 2015-09-30 Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy c71a7a4be7361094d046d312202bce0c 0000-0002-5153-573X Catherine Thornton Catherine Thornton true false 2015-09-30 BMS Allergic disease can be viewed as an early manifestation of immune dysregulation. Environmental exposures including maternal inflammation, diet, nutrient balance, microbial colonisation and toxin exposures can directly and indirectly influence immune programming in both pregnancy and the postnatal period. The intrauterine microclimate is critical for maternal and foetal immunological tolerance to sustain viable pregnancy, but appears susceptible to environmental conditions. Targeting aspects of the modern environment that promote aberrant patterns of immune response is logical for interventions aimed at primary prevention of allergic disease. Defining the mechanisms that underpin both natural and therapeutic acquisition of immunological tolerance in childhood will provide insights into the drivers of persistent immune dysregulation. In this review we summarise evidence that allergy is a consequence of intrauterine and early life immune dysregulation, with specific focus on contributing environmental risk factors occurring preconception, in utero and in the early postnatal period. We explore the immunological mechanisms which underpin tolerance and persistence of allergic disease during childhood. It is likely that future investigations within these two domains will ultimately provide a road map for the primary prevention of allergic disease. Journal Article Clinical & Experimental Allergy 45 5 844 858 31 12 2015 2015-12-31 10.1111/cea.12531 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University 2015-09-30T12:48:50.7473335 2015-09-30T12:30:35.6671138 Swansea University Medical School Medicine D. E. Campbell 1 R. J. Boyle 2 C. A. Thornton 3 S. L. Prescott 4 Catherine Thornton 0000-0002-5153-573X 5
title Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy
spellingShingle Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy
Catherine, Thornton
title_short Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy
title_full Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy
title_fullStr Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy
title_full_unstemmed Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy
title_sort Mechanisms of allergic disease - environmental and genetic determinants for the development of allergy
author_id_str_mv c71a7a4be7361094d046d312202bce0c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c71a7a4be7361094d046d312202bce0c_***_Catherine, Thornton
author Catherine, Thornton
author2 D. E. Campbell
R. J. Boyle
C. A. Thornton
S. L. Prescott
Catherine Thornton
format Journal article
container_title Clinical & Experimental Allergy
container_volume 45
container_issue 5
container_start_page 844
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1111/cea.12531
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
document_store_str 0
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description Allergic disease can be viewed as an early manifestation of immune dysregulation. Environmental exposures including maternal inflammation, diet, nutrient balance, microbial colonisation and toxin exposures can directly and indirectly influence immune programming in both pregnancy and the postnatal period. The intrauterine microclimate is critical for maternal and foetal immunological tolerance to sustain viable pregnancy, but appears susceptible to environmental conditions. Targeting aspects of the modern environment that promote aberrant patterns of immune response is logical for interventions aimed at primary prevention of allergic disease. Defining the mechanisms that underpin both natural and therapeutic acquisition of immunological tolerance in childhood will provide insights into the drivers of persistent immune dysregulation. In this review we summarise evidence that allergy is a consequence of intrauterine and early life immune dysregulation, with specific focus on contributing environmental risk factors occurring preconception, in utero and in the early postnatal period. We explore the immunological mechanisms which underpin tolerance and persistence of allergic disease during childhood. It is likely that future investigations within these two domains will ultimately provide a road map for the primary prevention of allergic disease.
published_date 2015-12-31T03:38:36Z
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