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The use of novel digital power supply to drive laser systems. / Daniele Doneddu

Swansea University Author: Daniele, Doneddu

Abstract

Light-based therapies are becoming increasingly important and widely applied within the clinical practice. Their advantages over more traditional therapies have created an expanding market which is driving the development of more efficient and sophisticated devices. These devices allow a more precis...

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Published: 2010
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa42441
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Abstract: Light-based therapies are becoming increasingly important and widely applied within the clinical practice. Their advantages over more traditional therapies have created an expanding market which is driving the development of more efficient and sophisticated devices. These devices allow a more precise control of the characteristics of the optical output to maximise benefits of the treatment. Although many studies have been conducted on light, and more specifically lasers, both from a therapeutic and a technological perspective, there is still much research to be undertaken. Laser systems have been used for more than two decades for the treatment of vascular lesions. Indeed the application of selective photothermolysis utilising the monochromaticity of the laser system has become the treatment of choice. However the treatment of larger blood vessels remains problematic. Many workers have, for theoretical and clinical reasons, elected to choose the YAG laser for the treatment of larger thread veins and vascular lesions containing larger vessels. The therapeutic output has been mixed and the need for further work identified. This thesis describes the design of a novel approach to the control of the temporal profile of the YAG laser. The design aspect of the work includes a computer modelling study which shows that careful control of the temporal parameters can in principle improve the therapeutic output. A novel approach to the digital control of the flashlamps pumping the YAG crystal is also described. The digital control of the flashlamp translates to sensitive control of the temporal profile of the laser output in a way that has not been described to date. The thesis therefore concludes that control of the temporal output of the YAG laser, if possible, should give improved therapeutic output and that the necessary level of control can be achieved by advanced digital techniques. Future clinical work should prove improved therapeutic results.
Keywords: Biomedical engineering.
College: Swansea University Medical School