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Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology

Fan Li, Fabrizio Roccaforte, Giuseppe Greco, Patrick Fiorenza, Francesco La Via, Amador Pérez-Tomas, Jonathan Edward Evans Orcid Logo, Craig Fisher, Finn Alec Monaghan, Philip Andrew Mawby, Mike Jennings Orcid Logo

Materials, Volume: 14, Issue: 19, Start page: 5831

Swansea University Authors: Jonathan Edward Evans Orcid Logo, Craig Fisher, Mike Jennings Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ma14195831

Abstract

Wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors are becoming more widely accepted for use in power electronics due to their superior electrical energy efficiencies and improved power densities. Although WBG cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) displays a modest bandgap compared to its commercial counterparts (4H-silico...

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Published in: Materials
ISSN: 1996-1944 1996-1944
Published: MDPI AG 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58482
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Although WBG cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) displays a modest bandgap compared to its commercial counterparts (4H-silicon carbide and gallium nitride), this material has excellent attributes as the WBG semiconductor of choice for low-resistance, reliable diode and MOS devices. At present the material remains firmly in the research domain due to numerous technological impediments that hamper its widespread adoption. The most obvious obstacle is defect-free 3C-SiC; presently, 3C-SiC bulk and heteroepitaxial (on-silicon) display high defect densities such as stacking faults and antiphase boundaries. Moreover, heteroepitaxy 3C-SiC-on-silicon means low temperature processing budgets are imposed upon the system (max. temperature limited to ~1400 &#xB0;C) limiting selective doping realisation. This paper will give a brief overview of some of the scientific aspects associated with 3C-SiC processing technology in addition to focussing on the latest state of the art results. A particular focus will be placed upon key process steps such as Schottky and ohmic contacts, ion implantation and MOS processing including reliability. 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spelling 2021-11-18T16:50:42.5732094 v2 58482 2021-10-27 Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology 8e994bbfa133c2fcc7598d01c541f340 NULL Jonathan Edward Evans Jonathan Edward Evans true true f3bbdff7aa4d5da9e8e309a6294bc505 Craig Fisher Craig Fisher true false e0ba5d7ece08cd70c9f8f8683996454a 0000-0003-3270-0805 Mike Jennings Mike Jennings true false 2021-10-27 Wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors are becoming more widely accepted for use in power electronics due to their superior electrical energy efficiencies and improved power densities. Although WBG cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) displays a modest bandgap compared to its commercial counterparts (4H-silicon carbide and gallium nitride), this material has excellent attributes as the WBG semiconductor of choice for low-resistance, reliable diode and MOS devices. At present the material remains firmly in the research domain due to numerous technological impediments that hamper its widespread adoption. The most obvious obstacle is defect-free 3C-SiC; presently, 3C-SiC bulk and heteroepitaxial (on-silicon) display high defect densities such as stacking faults and antiphase boundaries. Moreover, heteroepitaxy 3C-SiC-on-silicon means low temperature processing budgets are imposed upon the system (max. temperature limited to ~1400 °C) limiting selective doping realisation. This paper will give a brief overview of some of the scientific aspects associated with 3C-SiC processing technology in addition to focussing on the latest state of the art results. A particular focus will be placed upon key process steps such as Schottky and ohmic contacts, ion implantation and MOS processing including reliability. Finally, the paper will discuss some device prototypes (diodes and MOSFET) and draw conclusions around the prospects for 3C-SiC devices based upon the processing technology presented. Journal Article Materials 14 19 5831 MDPI AG 1996-1944 1996-1944 3C-SiC, power electronics, cubic silicon carbide 5 10 2021 2021-10-05 10.3390/ma14195831 COLLEGE NANME Engineering COLLEGE CODE Swansea University H2020 Energy Grant: 720827 2021-11-18T16:50:42.5732094 2021-10-27T16:53:26.0001143 College of Engineering Engineering Fan Li 1 Fabrizio Roccaforte 2 Giuseppe Greco 3 Patrick Fiorenza 4 Francesco La Via 5 Amador Pérez-Tomas 6 Jonathan Edward Evans NULL 7 Craig Fisher 8 Finn Alec Monaghan 9 Philip Andrew Mawby 10 Mike Jennings 0000-0003-3270-0805 11 58482__21328__7c64f1024d9e4276b6b064b6038af0b5.pdf 58482.pdf 2021-10-27T16:57:06.8666422 Output 4263490 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2021 by the authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology
spellingShingle Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology
Jonathan Edward Evans
Craig Fisher
Mike Jennings
title_short Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology
title_full Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology
title_fullStr Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology
title_full_unstemmed Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology
title_sort Status and Prospects of Cubic Silicon Carbide Power Electronics Device Technology
author_id_str_mv 8e994bbfa133c2fcc7598d01c541f340
f3bbdff7aa4d5da9e8e309a6294bc505
e0ba5d7ece08cd70c9f8f8683996454a
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8e994bbfa133c2fcc7598d01c541f340_***_Jonathan Edward Evans
f3bbdff7aa4d5da9e8e309a6294bc505_***_Craig Fisher
e0ba5d7ece08cd70c9f8f8683996454a_***_Mike Jennings
author Jonathan Edward Evans
Craig Fisher
Mike Jennings
author2 Fan Li
Fabrizio Roccaforte
Giuseppe Greco
Patrick Fiorenza
Francesco La Via
Amador Pérez-Tomas
Jonathan Edward Evans
Craig Fisher
Finn Alec Monaghan
Philip Andrew Mawby
Mike Jennings
format Journal article
container_title Materials
container_volume 14
container_issue 19
container_start_page 5831
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 1996-1944
1996-1944
doi_str_mv 10.3390/ma14195831
publisher MDPI AG
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description Wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors are becoming more widely accepted for use in power electronics due to their superior electrical energy efficiencies and improved power densities. Although WBG cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) displays a modest bandgap compared to its commercial counterparts (4H-silicon carbide and gallium nitride), this material has excellent attributes as the WBG semiconductor of choice for low-resistance, reliable diode and MOS devices. At present the material remains firmly in the research domain due to numerous technological impediments that hamper its widespread adoption. The most obvious obstacle is defect-free 3C-SiC; presently, 3C-SiC bulk and heteroepitaxial (on-silicon) display high defect densities such as stacking faults and antiphase boundaries. Moreover, heteroepitaxy 3C-SiC-on-silicon means low temperature processing budgets are imposed upon the system (max. temperature limited to ~1400 °C) limiting selective doping realisation. This paper will give a brief overview of some of the scientific aspects associated with 3C-SiC processing technology in addition to focussing on the latest state of the art results. A particular focus will be placed upon key process steps such as Schottky and ohmic contacts, ion implantation and MOS processing including reliability. Finally, the paper will discuss some device prototypes (diodes and MOSFET) and draw conclusions around the prospects for 3C-SiC devices based upon the processing technology presented.
published_date 2021-10-05T04:34:10Z
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